Army Signals Collection Analyst - MOS 35S
Army

Army Signals Collection Analyst (MOS 35S)

Army Signals Collection Analysts (MOS 35S) is responsible for the detection, acquisition, location, and identification of foreign electronic intelligence.

The analyst is tasked with exploiting non-voice communications and other electronic signals in order to produce strategic and tactical intelligence.

Are you interested in becoming an Army Signals Collection Analyst (MOS 35S)?

Learn more about the role of 35S MOS including job duties, salary, training, and civilian job outlook.

Education, Qualifications, and Training

35s mos army
Army Signals Collection Analysts (MOS 35S) use SIGINT equipment to exploit non-voice communications. Image: Army.com

Signals Collection Analysts (MOS 35S) have an important responsibility within the U.S. Army.

As a result, you will need to complete the necessary education, qualifications, and training in order to become an Army Signals Collection Analyst.

Related ArticleArmy Intelligence Analyst (MOS 35F): Career Details

Education

You are not allowed to enlist in the U.S. Army without completing high school or receiving a GED equivalent.

Those that are interested in becoming an Army Signals Collection Analyst should consult a local recruiter.

The Army recruiter will get you connected with the resources needed to complete the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).

In order to remain considered for MOS 35S you must complete a score of Skilled Technical (ST): 101.

Prospective Army Signals Collection Analysts must also take the Army Analysis Aptitude Test.

Qualifications

The job requirements for 35S MOS are pretty intense.

A big part of your commitment to becoming an Army Signals Collection Analyst is gaining top-secret security clearance.

The Department of Defense takes the matter very seriously and therefore conducts an extremely thorough investigation.

The Army will look into your criminal history, finances, alcohol and drug use, as well as references.

You are not allowed to join MOS 35S with any conviction by court-martial.

The same goes for civil court convictions with the exception of minor traffic violations.

Alcohol or drug abuse may disqualify you as well as any record of selling or manufacturing narcotics.

Finally, soldiers (and their spouses) that work 35S MOS cannot have any family members that live in a country where physical or mental coercion is a common practice.

The Department of Defense considers it a conflict of interest and will likely disqualify you from this particular Military Occupational Specialty (MOS).

The same is true of Peace Corps.

If you were a previous member of the Peace Corps the Army will not qualify you for MOS 35S because the federal government is trying to prevent any perception that Peace Corps volunteers may also act as spies or intelligence agents.

Training

Everyone that joins the U.S. Army gets their start at boot camp.

Boot camp, or Basic Combat Training (BCT) lasts 10 weeks.

If you survive boot camp you will begin to train for your MOS through Advanced Individual Training (AIT).

The amount of time spent training for an Army Signals Collection Analyst (MOS 35S) is 15 weeks.

The training takes place at Corry Station Naval Technical Training Center in Pensacola, Florida.

Those that thrive training for MOS 35S have an interest in working with radio equipment and use clues to help solve problems.

The Army also mentions it helps to have the ability to remain alert doing repetitive tasks commonly associated with the role of an Army Signals Collection Analyst.

What does an Army Signals Collection Analyst Do?

Signals Collection Analysts (MOS 35S) work as part of a larger Military Intelligence (MI) team. Image: Army.com

Army Signals Collection Analysts listen and watch foreign electronics communications.

They interpret and identify the communications in order to assist with strategic approaches and plans.

Army Signals Collection Analysts generally deal with non-voice communications.

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Signals Equipment

Army Signals Collection Analysts (MOS 35S) are part of a larger Military Intelligence (MI) team that deals with highly sensitive information.

A big part of your job is to monitor signals intelligence (SIGINT) equipment.

You use the equipment to study non-voice communications and relay important information back to your superiors. 

Signals Collection Analysts (35S MOS) will prepare logs and reports to deliver to commanding officers.

Analyzing Target Communications

One of the job duties of an Army Signals Collection Analyst is to scan the radio spectrum.

From there they are able to collect and identify target communications.

Signals Collection Analysts use the radio spectrum to perform analysis and determine signal parameters.

Information that is gathered is either prepared in reports or added to technical databases for intelligence collection operations.

Related ArticleArmy Signals Intelligence Analyst (MOS 35N): Career Details

What does an Army Signals Collection Analyst make?

army mos 35s analyst
Working MOS 35S can lead to other careers in the federal government, including with the NSA. Image: Army.com

The Army does not pay based on your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS).

Army Signals Collection Analysts, like every other Army MOS, is paid based on rank and years of service.

InsigniaPay GradeRankAbbreviationAvg. Monthly Pay
E-1PrivatePVT$1,681
E-2Private Second ClassPV2$1,884
army e 3 insignia - pfcE-3Private First ClassPFC$1,981
army e 4 insignia - specialistE-4SpecialistSPC$2,195
army e 4 insignia - corporalE-4CorporalCPL$2,195
E-5SergeantSGT$2,394
E-6Staff SergeantSSG$2,613
E-7Sergeant First ClassSFC$3,021
army e 8 insignia - master sergeantE-8Master SergeantMSG$4,345
E-8First Sergeant1SG$4,345
E-9Sergeant MajorSGM$5,308
E-9Command Sergeant MajorCSM$5,308
e 9 sergeant major of the army insigniaE-9Sergeant Major of the ArmySMA$5,308

Benefits

Serving the U.S. Army includes many other benefits in addition to a monthly salary:

  • Medical Insurance
  • Vacation Time
  • Special Pay
  • Retirement
  • Housing: Allowances for living expenses, utilities, and maintenance.
  • Food: Allowance for the on-base dining hall and access to tax-free department and grocery stores.
  • Education: Army members can earn full-tuition, merit-based scholarships, allowances for books and fees, plus annual stipend for living expenses.

Job Reviews

Unfortunately, there are very few job reviews on the World Wide Web related to the role of an Army Signals Collection Analyst (MOS 35S).

The main reason why is the job is very secretive with top security military clearance needed to perform the job duties.

As a result, current Army Signals Collection Analysts are unable to disclose much about their MOS.

You can browse potential job opportunities for Signal Collection Analysts following military service at websites like Indeed.com.

Civilian Job Opportunities

Though there are civilian jobs related to Signal Collection Analysts the vast majority of former 35S MOS transition into a job with a government agency.

The National Security Agency (NSA) regularly hires Military Intelligence (35) Specialists from the U.S. Army.

Those that choose to move toward the private sector can find jobs working as radio operators, sound engineers, computer operators, database administrators, or technical writers.

Related ArticleArmy Human Intelligence Collector (MOS 35M): Career Details

Summary

An Army Signals Collection Analyst (MOS 35S) exploits non-voice communications and other electronic signals to gain a strategical advantage on the battlefield.

They are responsible for detecting, analyzing, and identifying foreign electronic intelligence.

Resources:

  1. https://www.goarmy.com/careers-and-jobs/browse-career-and-job-categories/computers-and-technology/signals-collector-analyst.html
  2. https://www.cool.army.mil/enlisted/35s.htm
Rob V.
Rob V.
Rob V. is the founder of OperationMilitaryKids.org. While he never actually served in the US Military, he has a passion for writing about military related topics. Born and raised in Woodbridge, NJ, he graduated from the New Jersey Institute Of Technology with an MBA in eCommerce. His hobbies include beach volleyball, target shooting, and lifting. Rob is also a commercially rated pilot with over 1,500 hours of flight time.

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