USMC 62 Field - Fixed Wing Aircraft Maintenance/Mechanic
Marines

USMC 62 Field (Fixed Wing Aircraft Maintenance/Mechanic)

USMC 62 Field Fixed Wing Aircraft Maintenance/Mechanic is an occupational field of the Marine Corps.

The Marine Corps separates Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) into OccFlds in order to organize the diverse amount of jobs in the U.S. Armed Forces.

USMC 62 Field is related to aviation jobs that have to do with fixed-wing aircraft maintenance and mechanics.

The other Marine Corps OccFlds related to aviation include Field 60 (Aircraft Maintenance), Field 61 (Helicopter), and Field 63 (Avionics).

Related ArticleUSMC Field 60 (Aircraft Maintenance/Mechanic): 2019 Career Details

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MOS 6212

MOS 6213

MOS 6214

MOS 6216

MOS 6217

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MOS 6223
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MOS 6227

MOS 6251

MOS 6252

MOS 6253

MOS 6256

MOS 6257

MOS 6276

MOS 6281

MOS 6282

MOS 6283

MOS 6286

MOS 6287

Purpose of USMC Field 62

usmc 62 field
USMC 62 Field soldiers are highly trained and skilled mechanics. Image: Department of Defense

USMC 62 Field is responsible for aviation jobs that have to do with fixed-wing aircraft.

Fixed wing aircraft is defined by the Marine Corps as a flying machine, like an airplane, which is capable of flight using wings that generate lift.

The type of aircraft is different from rotary-wing aircraft and ornithopters.

Marine Corps OccFld 62 helps provide direct or indirect support to fixed wing aircraft in order to ensure full working order as well as keep pilots safe.

Soldiers that wish to serve in USMC 62 Field must meet the basic qualifications including education and training.

Marines must also complete the Armed Services Aptitude Vocational Battery (ASVAB) which is a series of tests provided by the military.

Every Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) in the U.S. Armed Forces has minimum standards on the ASVAB in order to qualify for the military job.

Training for the Marine Corps begins for all soldiers, regardless of MOS, at boot camp.

Those that survive boot camp begin receiving specialized training for their MOS immediately thereafter.

Let’s take a look at the various MOS offered under USMC 62 Field…

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6212-6217)

marine corp aviation mechanic
Marine OccFld 62 jobs teach you everything you need to know about aviation operations. Image: 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing

Fixed wing aircraft mechanics are the heart of USMC 62 Field.

Soldiers inspect and maintain airframes and components related to fixed wing aircraft.

The job is important not only to ensure high performance of fixed wing aircraft.

Mechanics are also necessary to guarantee the safety and well-being of pilots and other military personnel boarding the aircraft.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanic (MOS 6212)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6212) are associated with AV-8/TAV-S aircraft.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6212) inspect and maintain AV-8/TAV-S aircraft airframes and components.

Mechanics may also perform duties related to flight line operations.

The AV-8B Harrier II is the only short takeoff fixed wing landing jet currently in the Marine Corps.

It is an essential type of aircraft needed by the USMC for specialized operations.

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics must score Mechanical Maintenance (MM): 105 or higher on the ASVAB in order to qualify for the MOS.

Normal vision with no color blindness is another common expectation of USMC 62 Field Mechanics.

Training is provided through the Aviation Machinist Mate Common Core Class and Aviation Machinist Mate Turbojet Aircraft Fundamentals Strand Class in Florida.

Additional training takes place at the AV-8 Aircraft mechanic Organizational Maintenance course in North Carolina.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanic (MOS 6213)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6213) inspect and maintain aircraft airframes and components related to the EA-6.

The EA-6 Northrop Grumman is a twin-engine, four-seat, fixed wing aircraft which is a stepchild of the A-6 Intruder.

The Grumman EA-6 Prowler is capable of firing anti-radiation missiles (ARMs) and has a variety of other unique features.

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics may also receive duties assigned to flight line operations.

In order to qualify for MOS 6213 soldiers are expected to score a minimum of Mechanical Maintenance (MM): 105 on the ASVAB.

Training is received through formal A and C school training specific to operating on EA-6 aircraft.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Mechanic (MOS 6214)

Marine Corps Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Mechanics (MOS 6214) are another important MOS of USMC 62 Field.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), or drones, are still operated by a human pilot yet the individual is not aboard the actual aircraft.

Marine Corps Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Mechanics inspect and maintain all the working components and airframe of UAVs.

Once again duties related to flight line operations are also assigned to USMC 62 Field Mechanics.

Normal color vision and minimum ASVAB score of Mechanical Maintenance (MM): 105 is required for the military occupation.

The Aviation Structural Mechanic Core and Aviation Structural Mechanic Organizational Level Strand Class handle initial training for MOS 6214.

Additional training is received at the Shadow UAV Mechanical Maintenance Specialist Course in Arizona, or another UAS training site.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanic (MOS 6216)

Marine Corps Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6216) are responsible for the KC-130 aircraft.

The Lockheed Martin KC-130 is a family of the C-130 Hercules series which provides aerial refueling for other military aircraft.

Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6216) inspect and maintain the working components of the KC-130 as well as assist with flight line operations.

The general requirements for MOS 6216 are the same as the other Marine Corps mechanic jobs.

Training takes place at the Aviation Machinist Mate Common Core Class and Aviation Machinist Mate Turbojet Aircraft Fundamentals Strand Class in Florida.

Formal C school training takes place at KC-130 Aircraft Mechanic Organizational Maintenance and/or KC-130J Aircraft Mechanic Organizational Maintenance Course.

Both those courses are held at Little Rock Air Force Base in Arkansas.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanic (MOS 6217)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6217) inspect and maintain airframes and components of the F/A-18.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6217) may also assist with flight line operations.

The McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet is a twin-engine and supersonic jet that performs well as both a fighter and attack aircraft.

It is most well known as the preferred aircraft for the Navy Blue Angels since 1986.

The traditional requirements of MOS 6217 are the same as other Fixed-Winged Aircraft Mechanics (MOS 6212-6217).

Formal A school training takes place at the Aviation Machinist Mate Common Core Class and Aviation Machinist Mate Turbojet Aircraft Fundamentals Strand Class A1 in Florida.

Formal C school training is conducted through the F/A-18 Power Plants and Related Systems Organizational Maintenance Course in Virginia.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6222-6227)

marine fixed wing aircraft mechanic
Fixed-wing Mechanics service several different types of aircraft. Image: Max Pixels

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics are responsible for maintaining and repairing turbine engines and propellers.

The job duties may include inspecting parts and disassembling engines.

USMC 62 Field breaks down Power Plants Mechanics into several different MOS based on the fixed winged aircraft they operate.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanic (MOS 6222)

Marine Corps Fixed Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6222) inspect, maintain, test, and repair F-402 aircraft.

The F-402 is a single engine that is installed on all AV-8B aircraft.

Marine Corps Fixed Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6222) are required to score at least Mechanical Maintenance (MM): 105 on the ASVAB.

Normal color vision is another requirement of Power Plants Mechanics.

Training for MOS 6222 takes place at the Aviation Machinist Mate Common Core Class and Aviation Machinist Mate Turbojet Aircraft Fundamentals Strand Class in Florida.

Formal C school training is held at the F402-RR-408A/MK.4 CROO305 Gas Turbine Starter (GTS)/F402-44-406A Intermediate Maintenance course in North Carolina.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanic (MOS 6223)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6223) perform operations on the J-52 engine.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6223) are required to inspect, test, maintain, and repair the power plants components.

MOS 6223 are required to score at least Mechanical Maintenance (MM): 105 or higher on the ASVAB.

Marines train at the Aviation Machinist Mate Common Core Class and Aviation Machinist Mate Turbojet Aircraft Fundamentals Strand Class.

Additional training is conducted at the J-52 Engine First Degree Intermediate Maintenance School in Washington.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanic (MOS 6226)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6226) inspect and maintain T-56 engines.

Once tests are conducted and inspections are made the mechanics may perform a variety of repairs on T-56 aircraft engines.

Marine MOS 6226 Mechanics are required to meet the same qualifications as other Power Plants Mechanics 

Formal Marine A school training is held at the Aviation Machinist Mate Common Core Class and Aviation Machinist Mate Turbojet Aircraft Fundamentals Strand Class in Florida.

Formal C school training takes place in Texas through the Aircraft Power Plants Mechanic T-56 course.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanic (MOS 6227)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6227) inspect, maintain, and repair F-404 turbofan engines.

The General Electric F-404 is part of a family that also includes the F412 engine.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Power Plants Mechanics (MOS 6227) complete full repairs on aircraft power plants and systems.

Standard requirements of MOS 6227 are comparable to other Power Plants Mechanics MOS under USMC 62 Field.

Related ArticleMarine Corps PFT Standards

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanics (MOS 6251-6257)

usmc aviation mos
Marine Fixed-Wing Mechanics learn job skills 99% of the population is unable to complete. Image: Department of Defense

Marine Airframe Mechanics perform maintenance and repairs on the body and structure of the aircraft.

Therefore, Airframe Mechanics are more focused on the exterior of the aircraft, excluding the propellers and power plants.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic-Trainee (MOS 6251)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic-Trainees (MOS 6251) are entry-level technicians of USMC 62 Field.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic Trainees work under the close supervision of supervisors.

The objective of MOS 6251 is to train to work under one of the below MOS 6252-6257 specialties.

The entry-level position is available by completing the ASVAB (with minimum Maintenance Mechanical (MM): 105), completing a respirator physical, and demonstrating normal color vision.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic (MOS 6252)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanics (MOS 6252) are one opportunity for trainees to progress to after completing requirements of MOS 6251.

An Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic (MOS 6252) inspects and maintains hydraulic/pneumatics, as well as structure systems related to the AV-8/TAV-8.

Training is offered through the Aviation Structural Mechanic Core and Aviation Structural Mechanic Organizational Level Strand in Florida.

Secondly, MOS 6252 must complete the AV-8B Airframes Organizational Maintenance Course.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic (MOS 6253)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanics (MOS 6253) inspect and maintain EA-6 aircraft.

The objective is comparable of MOS 6252 with a focus on repairing aircraft hydraulics and pneumatics.

MOS 6252 Airframe Mechanics will also inspect and repair structure systems.

Soldiers must complete the Aviation Structural Mechanic Core and Aviation Structural Mechanic Organizational Level Strand.

Formal C school training is held through the EA-6B Hydraulic/Structures Systems Organizational Maintenance Program.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic (MOS 6256)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanics (MOS 6256) are assigned to KC-130 aircraft.

Once again the job duties revolve around inspecting, maintaining, and repairing aircraft hydraulic/pneumatic and structure systems.

Marine Formal A school training is conducted through the Aviation Structural Mechanic Core and Aviation Structural Mechanic Organizational Level Strand.

Formal C school training takes place in Arkansas through the Aircraft Airframe Mechanic KC-130 or KC-130J Aircraft Mechanic Organizational Level.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanic (MOS 6257)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanics (MOS 6257) are assigned to F/A-18 aircraft.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Airframe Mechanics (MOS 6257) maintain and repair F/A-18 hydraulics and structure systems.

Training is also held in Florida through the Aviation Structural Mechanic Core and Aviation Structural Mechanic Organizational Level Strands.

The F/A-18 Aviation Hydraulic/Structural Mechanic Organizational Maintenance (C school) takes place in Virginia.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Crew Master KC-130 (MOS 6276)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Crew Masters (MOS 6276) are committed to taking care of duties related to the KC-130.

MOS 6276 are considered mission essential aircrew that assist with the maintenance and operation of the aircraft.

Marine Fixed-Wing Aircraft Crew Masters perform pre-flight and post-flight inspections.

There are other assignments including helping load cargo and passengers, as well as computing weight and balance of the aircraft.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Crew Masters (MOS 6276) will assist the pilot and copilot with takeoff and landing procedures.

Aircraft Crew Masters of the KC-130 are trained to maintain the engine, propeller, electrical, and hydraulics of the aircraft.

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Crew Masters is one of the most desirable and sought after positions of USMC 62 Field.

There are a number of prerequisites and requirements mandatory to qualify for MOS 6276.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic (MOS 6281-6287)

usmc 62 field mos
Serving Marine Corps OccFld 62 teaches you about critical thinking and teamwork. Image: Wikimedia Commons

Marine Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics make sure the safety equipment is operable and fully accessible if it is needed.

The standard requirements of MOS 6281-6287 are comparable to other USMC 62 Field jobs with a required minimum ASVAB score of Mechanical Maintenance (MM): 105 and normal color vision.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic-Trainee (MOS 6281)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic-Trainees (MOS 6281) are entry-level technicians of USMC 62 Field.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic-Trainees learn more about job duties related to MOS 6282-6287 through instruction and close supervision of another higher ranking Marine.

It is a good way to learn more about a variety of Marine aircraft before deciding which one you prefer to specialize on.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic (MOS 6282)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics (MOS 6282) inspect, maintain, and repair AV-8/TJW-B aircraft safety equipment and systems.

Additional qualifications of MOS 6282 include meeting the medical requirements for Explosives Handlers (Article 15-71B).

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics must complete the Aviation Structural Mechanic E (Safety Equipment) Core Class A1 and Aviation Structural Mechanic and (Safety Equipment) Egress Strand Class.

More specialized training is conducted through the AV-8B Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic Organizational Maintenance course.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic (MOS 6283)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics (MOS 6283) are assigned to EA-6 aircraft.

Once again the primary objective is to maintain and repair safety equipment and systems.

MOS 6283 must also meet the medical requirements for Marine Explosives Handlers.

The Aviation Structural Mechanic E (Safety Equipment) Core Class A1 and Aviation Structural Mechanic E (Safety Equipment) Egress Strand Class A1 handles initial job training.

The EA-6B Safety Equipment Organizational Maintenance in Washington takes care of C school training.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic (MOS 6286)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics (MOS 6286) are assigned to KC-130 aircraft.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics are depended upon to keep safety equipment in full working order.

The same qualifications are required of MOS 6286 Mechanics as MOS 6283 and MOS 6282.

Training is a combination of A school course work in Florida and C school course work in North Carolina.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanic (MOS 6287)

Marine Corps Fixed-Wing Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics (MOS 6287) are delegated to safety equipment checks on F/A-18 aircraft.

The purpose is to maintain and repair damaged or unreliable safety equipment and systems.

Training is completed in Florida through the Aviation Structural Mechanic E (Safety Equipment) Core Class A1 and Aviation Structural Mechanic E (Safety Equipment) Egress Strand Class A1.

The F/A-18 Environmental Control System and Safety Equipment Organizational Maintenance (Virginia) takes care of formal C school training.

USMC 62 Field (Fixed Wing Aircraft Maintenance/Mechanic) – Pay

marine corps mos pay
A passion for aviation and mechanics makes USMC 62 Field a perfect military career path. Image: U.S. Africa Command

The Marine Corps pays soldiers based on rank and years of service.

Therefore, USMC 62 Field soldiers can expect to receive comparable pay regardless of MOS:

InsigniaPay GradeRankAbbreviation2019 Pay (Monthly)
E-1PrivatePvt$1,681
E-2Private First ClassPFC$1,884
E-3Lance CorporalLCpl$1,981
E-4CorporalCpl$2,195
E-5SergeantSgt$2,394
E-6Staff SergeantSSgt$2,613
E-7Gunnery SergeantGySgt$3,021
E-8Master SergeantMSgt$4,345
E-8First Sergeant1stSgt$4,345
E-9Master Gunnery SergeantMGySgt$5,308
E-9Sergeant MajorSgtMaj$5,308
E-9Sergeant Major Of The Marine CorpsSgtMaj$5,308

Benefits

The Marine Corps offers many benefits in addition to a monthly paycheck:

  • Medical Insurance
  • Vacation Time
  • Special Pay
  • Retirement
  • Affordable Life Insurance
  • Housing: Allowances for living expenses, utilities, and maintenance.
  • Food: Allowance for the on-base dining hall and access to tax-free department and grocery stores.
  • Education: Marines can earn full-tuition, merit-based scholarships, allowances for books and fees, plus annual stipend for living expenses.

Job Reviews

It is difficult to find job reviews specific to MOS under USMC 62 Field.

However, you can find relevant job reviews about serving the Marine Corps in general on GlassDoor.com and Indeed.com.

Speaking to a local Marine recruiter can help answer addition questions you have about OccFld 62.

Related ArticleUSMC Field 61 (Aircraft Maintenance/Mechanic): 2019 Career Details

Civilian Job Opportunities

Marines that serve in the military in USMC 62 Field perform work on highly specialized and sophisticated fixed wing aircraft only found in the military.

However, the advanced mechanical and maintenance skills earned in OccFld 62 can lead to some high paying opportunities in the civilian world.

Commercial airliners and airports regularly hire former military mechanics for a variety of reasons.

Working on commercial jets and other specialized aircraft are unique skills that only the best mechanics are capable of diagnosing and resolving.

Summary

USMC 62 Field is an important military occupational job field responsible for fixed wing aircraft.

Working in Marine Corps OccFld 62 can provide a lot of opportunities for personal growth while you acquire some very specialized job skills.

Resources:

  1. https://www.marines.mil/Portals/1/Publications/MCO%20P4790.20.pdf
  2. https://www.cool.navy.mil/usn/overview/index.htm
  3. http://www.mosdb.com/marine-corps/

Levi D.

Levi served in the Marine Corps as a heavy equipment operator from 2007-2011. He deployed to Iraq in 2008 where he convoyed heavily around the Anbar province with a myriad of units. Following the Iraq deployment, Levi was assigned to various detachments who travelled and worked around Southeast Asia. He is now a freelance writer and outdoor enthusiast who spends much of his year traveling between campsites around the country.
Levi D.

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